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ABOUT

BooksActually is an independent bookstore located in Singapore. We specialise in Fiction and Literature (including obscure and critical works).

In our bookstore, you can often find literary trinkets in the form of stationery and other lovely tchotchkes.

We publish and distribute books under our imprint Math Paper Press. We also hand-stitch notebooks and produce stationery under Birds & Co.

BooksActually is now housed at No. 9 Yong Siak Street, in the heart of Tiong Bahru. Come, say hello !

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Vintage Glasses (now available at BooksActually!)

4:21 pm  8 notes

Vintage Glasses (now available at BooksActually!)

"There could not have been a lovelier sight; but there was none to see it except a little boy who was staring in at the window. He had ecstasies innumerable that other children can never know; but he was looking through the window at the one joy from which he must be for ever barred."—from Peter Pan by J M Barrie

12:39 am  42 notes

"There could not have been a lovelier sight; but there was none to see it except a little boy who was staring in at the window. He had ecstasies innumerable that other children can never know; but he was looking through the window at the one joy from which he must be for ever barred."

—from Peter Pan by J M Barrie

Vintage Sarsi Glasses (now available at BooksActually!)

11:26 pm  3 notes

Vintage Sarsi Glasses (now available at BooksActually!)

"Trying to write about love is ultimately like trying to have a dictionary represent life. No matter how many words there are, there will never be enough."—from The Lover’s Dictionary by David Levithan(NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSTORE !)

8:47 pm  42 notes

"Trying to write about love is ultimately like trying to have a dictionary represent life. No matter how many words there are, there will never be enough."

—from The Lover’s Dictionary by David Levithan


(NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSTORE !)

8:36 pm  18 notes

CHINEASY

Learn to read and write Chinese with Chineasy—a groundbreaking approach that transforms key Chinese characters into pictograms for easy recall and comprehension.

Chinese is one of the oldest written languages, and one of the most difficult to master, especially for Westerners. With Chineasy, learning and reading Chinese has never been simpler or more fun. Breaking down the Great Wall of Language, Shaolan Hsueh draws on her entrepreneurial and cultural background to create a simple system for quickly understanding the basic building blocks of written Chinese. Working with renowned illustrator Noma Bar, she transforms Chinese characters into charming pictograms that are easy to remember.

In Chineasy, she teaches the key characters, called radicals, that are the language’s foundation, and then shows how they can be combined to form new words and even phrases. Once you’ve mastered these key characters, you can practice your skills with three stories—a fairy tale, an Asian legend, and a contemporary fable—told using the radicals.

With Chineasy, readers of all ages will be able to navigate a Chinese menu, read signs and billboards, and grasp the meaning of most articles in a Chinese newspaper.


(NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSTORE !)

"Some have argued that because the universe is like a clock, there must be a Clockmaker. As the eighteenth-century British empiricist David Hume pointed out, this is a slippery argument, because there is nothing that is really perfectly analogous to the universe as a whole, unless it’s another universe, so we shouldn’t try to pass off anything that is just a part of this universe. Why a clock anyhow? Hume asks. Why not say the universe is analogous to a kangaroo? After all, both are organically interconnected systems. But the kangaroo analogy would lead to a very different conclusion about the origin of the universe: namely, that it was born of another universe after that universe had sex with a third universe."—from Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar by Thomas Cathcart

1:33 pm  13 notes

"Some have argued that because the universe is like a clock, there must be a Clockmaker. As the eighteenth-century British empiricist David Hume pointed out, this is a slippery argument, because there is nothing that is really perfectly analogous to the universe as a whole, unless it’s another universe, so we shouldn’t try to pass off anything that is just a part of this universe. Why a clock anyhow? Hume asks. Why not say the universe is analogous to a kangaroo? After all, both are organically interconnected systems. But the kangaroo analogy would lead to a very different conclusion about the origin of the universe: namely, that it was born of another universe after that universe had sex with a third universe."

—from Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar by Thomas Cathcart

1:10 pm  256 notes

"If you remember me, then I don’t care if everyone else forgets."

—from Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami

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also by Haruki Murakami:

After Dark
A Wild Sheep Chase
The Elephant Vanishes
What I Talk About When I Talk About Running
Birthday Stories
Sputnik Sweetheart
South of the Border, West of the Sun
Norwegian Wood

FRANKIE #59Break out the Ice Vo-Vos and grab a mug of your favourite beige or brown liquid: issue 59 is on sale today and we think you’ll find it a tiny bit spectacular. Inside we have chats with young documentary makers about putting real life on film while dodging the secret police; a look at what it’s like running a hotel in Hobart (Fawlty Towers references and all); and an epic discussion with Britpop icon Damon Albarn about elephant poo, amongst other things. We meet a lady who loves hand-drawn type and another who paints huge, building-sized murals – plus two Sydneysiders with the best job title ever: “Dean of Awesome”. There are tips on how to cook and make friends in the Antarctic; patterns for knitting your own galah, cockatoo and kookaburra pals; and the slightly disturbing news that words like “buxom” and “defecate” didn’t always mean what you think they do. Four of our writers take us through the splendour and angst of their first gig, and others pen odes to extra-large knickers and why it sometimes pays to be a goth. On top of all this, we asked some of our favourite makers, designers and general handy types to have their creative way with the humble grey jumper. The result is a lot of stitching, embellishing and awesomeness that we’ll be auctioning off for a good cause, so you might be able to get your hands on one if you’re quick. Hurrah!

3:38 pm  15 notes

FRANKIE #59

Break out the Ice Vo-Vos and grab a mug of your favourite beige or brown liquid: issue 59 is on sale today and we think you’ll find it a tiny bit spectacular. Inside we have chats with young documentary makers about putting real life on film while dodging the secret police; a look at what it’s like running a hotel in Hobart (Fawlty Towers references and all); and an epic discussion with Britpop icon Damon Albarn about elephant poo, amongst other things. We meet a lady who loves hand-drawn type and another who paints huge, building-sized murals – plus two Sydneysiders with the best job title ever: “Dean of Awesome”. There are tips on how to cook and make friends in the Antarctic; patterns for knitting your own galah, cockatoo and kookaburra pals; and the slightly disturbing news that words like “buxom” and “defecate” didn’t always mean what you think they do. Four of our writers take us through the splendour and angst of their first gig, and others pen odes to extra-large knickers and why it sometimes pays to be a goth. On top of all this, we asked some of our favourite makers, designers and general handy types to have their creative way with the humble grey jumper. The result is a lot of stitching, embellishing and awesomeness that we’ll be auctioning off for a good cause, so you might be able to get your hands on one if you’re quick. Hurrah!

THE CONDE NAST TRAVELER BOOK OF UNFORGETTABLE JOURNEYS: Great Writers on Great Places Vol I & IITravel writing maintains its seemingly endless popularity, and this volume offers a particularly transporting body of work, pairing exotic locales with writers of the highest caliber: Russell Banks writes on the Everglades, Francine Prose explores the secrets of Prague, Robert Hughes takes us on a tour of Italy, and more. From the most beautiful gardens to visit in Japan to the best free things to do in Provence, this book is as enlightening as it is entertaining. Whether off to the other side of the globe or to their favorite reading chair, wanderers of every sort will find this book truly indispensable.(NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSTORE !)

2:49 pm  193 notes

THE CONDE NAST TRAVELER BOOK OF UNFORGETTABLE JOURNEYS: Great Writers on Great Places Vol I & II

Travel writing maintains its seemingly endless popularity, and this volume offers a particularly transporting body of work, pairing exotic locales with writers of the highest caliber: Russell Banks writes on the Everglades, Francine Prose explores the secrets of Prague, Robert Hughes takes us on a tour of Italy, and more. From the most beautiful gardens to visit in Japan to the best free things to do in Provence, this book is as enlightening as it is entertaining. Whether off to the other side of the globe or to their favorite reading chair, wanderers of every sort will find this book truly indispensable.


(NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSTORE !)

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