/

ELSEWHERE








/

ABOUT

BooksActually is an independent bookstore located in Singapore. We specialise in Fiction and Literature (including obscure and critical works).

In our bookstore, you can often find literary trinkets in the form of stationery and other lovely tchotchkes.

We publish and distribute books under our imprint Math Paper Press. We also hand-stitch notebooks and produce stationery under Birds & Co.

BooksActually is now housed at No. 9 Yong Siak Street, in the heart of Tiong Bahru. Come, say hello !

/

INSTAGRAM


10:44 pm  8 notes

KINFOLK MAGAZINE
Issue 13

Introducing the Imperfect Issue.
 For our autumn edition of Kinfolk, we’d like to celebrate the holes in our socks, our scorched attempts at marmalade making and all the crappy haircuts we’ve had over the years. We’re all guilty of occasionally attempting to make our lives seem a little cleaner or a bit more organized, but the reality is often quite different. There’s nothing wrong with daydreaming of an idyllic life, but what if we dropped the facade for a moment and celebrated our shortcomings? These flawed details are the beautifully blemished collateral of a life lived to the fullest. So make mistakes. Make a mess. Be imperfect.

4:04 pm  1 note

HELLO MR
Issue 04
about men who date men


now available at BooksActually !

AN ATTEMPT AT EXHAUSTING A PLACE IN PARISby Georges PerecOne overcast weekend in October 1974, Georges Perec set out in quest of the “infraordinary”: the humdrum, the non-event, the everyday—“what happens,” as he put it, “when nothing happens.” His choice of locale was Place Saint-Sulpice, where, ensconced behind first one cafe window, then another, he spent three days recording everything to pass through his field of vision: the people walking by; the buses and driving-school cars caught in their routes; the pigeons moving suddenly en masse; a wedding (and then a funeral) at the church in the center of the square; the signs, symbols and slogans littering everything; and the darkness that finally absorbs it all. In An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Paris, Perec compiled a melancholic, slightly eerie and oddly touching document in which existence boils down to rhythm, writing turns into time and the line between the empirical and the surreal grows surprisingly thin.

3:27 pm  15 notes

AN ATTEMPT AT EXHAUSTING A PLACE IN PARIS
by Georges Perec

One overcast weekend in October 1974, Georges Perec set out in quest of the “infraordinary”: the humdrum, the non-event, the everyday—“what happens,” as he put it, “when nothing happens.” His choice of locale was Place Saint-Sulpice, where, ensconced behind first one cafe window, then another, he spent three days recording everything to pass through his field of vision: the people walking by; the buses and driving-school cars caught in their routes; the pigeons moving suddenly en masse; a wedding (and then a funeral) at the church in the center of the square; the signs, symbols and slogans littering everything; and the darkness that finally absorbs it all. In An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Paris, Perec compiled a melancholic, slightly eerie and oddly touching document in which existence boils down to rhythm, writing turns into time and the line between the empirical and the surreal grows surprisingly thin.

"The medical literature on the causes of food poisoning is full of euphemisms and dry scientific terms: coliform levels, aerobic plate counts, sorbitol, MacConkey agar, and so on. Behind them lies a simple explanation for why eating a hamburger can now make you seriously ill: There is shit in the meat."—from Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser

3:21 pm  7 notes

"The medical literature on the causes of food poisoning is full of euphemisms and dry scientific terms: coliform levels, aerobic plate counts, sorbitol, MacConkey agar, and so on. Behind them lies a simple explanation for why eating a hamburger can now make you seriously ill: There is shit in the meat."

—from Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser

12:56 pm  55 notes

Time to get your book fix this weekend, at our POP-UP STORE @ MILLENIA WALK!(#01-83, right opposite The Hour Glass, 11am - 8pm daily.) 

Come, say hello :)

Q: If you have to choose a country that you think represents your character, what would it be?
Singapore. I am all about efficiency and paperwork. Also food; 90% of my thoughts revolve around food.
Q: Is there one person that you look up to and aspire to become?
I don’t know about ‘aspiring to become’ because for me, just ‘being’ is tough enough but there are a ton of people whom I want to have long conversations with, who I’d go to for advice if I could: Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Pooja Nansi, Steve Carrell, Jessica Bellamy, Lorelai Gilmore. Basically anyone who lives his/her life with grace and a sense of humor.
Q: What are your hopes for your first collection of poetry?
I’d be happy if the collection - to borrow my friend’s words - made someone somewhere feel something.
Q: In less than 100 words, tell us what this collection of poetry is about.
We Were Always Eating Expired Things is about human connection, the way I see it anyway. Our inherent desire to establish intimacy and our inevitable failure to do so. But also, I hope, a celebration of our persistence in trying anyway.
Q: Imagine this, one day you walked into a mirror and realized that you had just walked into a parallel universe. What kind of person do you think you will be in that parallel universe, and what would you do with that identity?
    I’d be a banker and the worst sort around. I wish I could say I donate half of my ginormous salary to charities but I’d probably just eat a lot of expensive steak and chocolates, and then pay people to massage the fat off me.
Get the book here!

1:46 pm  13 notes

Q: If you have to choose a country that you think represents your character, what would it be?

Singapore. I am all about efficiency and paperwork. Also food; 90% of my thoughts revolve around food.

Q: Is there one person that you look up to and aspire to become?

I don’t know about ‘aspiring to become’ because for me, just ‘being’ is tough enough but there are a ton of people whom I want to have long conversations with, who I’d go to for advice if I could: Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Pooja Nansi, Steve Carrell, Jessica Bellamy, Lorelai Gilmore. Basically anyone who lives his/her life with grace and a sense of humor.

Q: What are your hopes for your first collection of poetry?

I’d be happy if the collection - to borrow my friend’s words - made someone somewhere feel something.

Q: In less than 100 words, tell us what this collection of poetry is about.

We Were Always Eating Expired Things is about human connection, the way I see it anyway. Our inherent desire to establish intimacy and our inevitable failure to do so. But also, I hope, a celebration of our persistence in trying anyway.

Q: Imagine this, one day you walked into a mirror and realized that you had just walked into a parallel universe. What kind of person do you think you will be in that parallel universe, and what would you do with that identity?

I’d be a banker and the worst sort around. I wish I could say I donate half of my ginormous salary to charities but I’d probably just eat a lot of expensive steak and chocolates, and then pay people to massage the fat off me.

Get the book here!

WHAT THEY DON’T TEACH YOU AT HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOLby Mark H McCormackMark McCormack, dubbed ‘the most powerful man in sport’, founded IMG (International Management Group) on a handshake. It was the first and is the most successful sports management company in the world, becoming a multi-million dollar, worldwide corporation whose activities in the business and marketing spheres are so diverse as to defy classification. Here, Mark McCormack reveals the secret of his success to key business issues such as analysing yourself and others, sales, negotiation, time management, decision-making and communication. What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School fills the gaps between a business school education and the street knowledge that comes from the day-to-day experience of running a business and managing people. It shares the business skills, techniques and wisdom gleaned from twenty-five years of experience.(NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSTORE !)

11:45 am  16 notes

WHAT THEY DON’T TEACH YOU AT HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL
by Mark H McCormack

Mark McCormack, dubbed ‘the most powerful man in sport’, founded IMG (International Management Group) on a handshake. It was the first and is the most successful sports management company in the world, becoming a multi-million dollar, worldwide corporation whose activities in the business and marketing spheres are so diverse as to defy classification.

Here, Mark McCormack reveals the secret of his success to key business issues such as analysing yourself and others, sales, negotiation, time management, decision-making and communication. What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School fills the gaps between a business school education and the street knowledge that comes from the day-to-day experience of running a business and managing people. It shares the business skills, techniques and wisdom gleaned from twenty-five years of experience.


(NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR WEBSTORE !)

WAKING UP WITH YOU THIS MORNINGYou yawn. I watch your chin obey your mouththrough eyelids not yet sure that I’m awake.Small creases gossip softly on your face.The warmth you emanate will heat this house.I watch you coming back from where you’ve been.It clings to you. Your naked shoulders glow,catch dawn and hold it still and make it slow.Your eyebrows play your dreams through scene by scene.You burrow down then climb up laughing, squash me,your hungry kiss-mouth wanting to be fed.Slow and soft, you spread yourself across meyour lips lead mine like needles leading thread.Sometimes I catch a glimpse and I’m amazed:I’ve seen you but not looked at you for days.—from Hold Your Own by Kate Tempest

6:47 pm  47 notes

WAKING UP WITH YOU THIS MORNING

You yawn. I watch your chin obey your mouth
through eyelids not yet sure that I’m awake.
Small creases gossip softly on your face.
The warmth you emanate will heat this house.

I watch you coming back from where you’ve been.
It clings to you. Your naked shoulders glow,
catch dawn and hold it still and make it slow.
Your eyebrows play your dreams through scene by scene.

You burrow down then climb up laughing, squash me,
your hungry kiss-mouth wanting to be fed.
Slow and soft, you spread yourself across me
your lips lead mine like needles leading thread.

Sometimes I catch a glimpse and I’m amazed:
I’ve seen you but not looked at you for days.


—from Hold Your Own by Kate Tempest

“Then he made one last effort to search in his heart for the place where his affection had rotted away, and he could not find it.” ― Gabriel García Márquez

6:38 pm  593 notes

“Then he made one last effort to search in his heart for the place where his affection had rotted away, and he could not find it.” ― Gabriel García Márquez

        Next Page
s.t.