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ELSEWHERE








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ABOUT

BooksActually is an independent bookstore located in Singapore. We specialise in Fiction and Literature (including obscure and critical works).

In our bookstore, you can often find literary trinkets in the form of stationery and other lovely tchotchkes.

We publish and distribute books under our imprint Math Paper Press. We also hand-stitch notebooks and produce stationery under Birds & Co.

BooksActually is now housed at No. 9 Yong Siak Street, in the heart of Tiong Bahru. Come, say hello !

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INSTAGRAM


BODY BOUNDARIESedited by Tania De Rozario / Zarina Muhammad / Krishna Udayasankar
Body Boundaries is an anthology of words by twenty-seven women writers from Singapore. Comprising works of poetry and prose, the collection breaks down barriers between public and private, personal and political, to reveal both collective and diverse experiences threaded together by identity markers of gender and geography.The collection is the first volume of a series by EtiquetteSG, a multidisciplinary platform dedicated to developing and showcasing art, writing, film and music created by women in Singapore.

12:50 pm  18 notes

BODY BOUNDARIES
edited by Tania De Rozario / Zarina Muhammad / Krishna Udayasankar


Body Boundaries is an anthology of words by twenty-seven women writers from Singapore. Comprising works of poetry and prose, the collection breaks down barriers between public and private, personal and political, to reveal both collective and diverse experiences threaded together by identity markers of gender and geography.

The collection is the first volume of a series by EtiquetteSG, a multidisciplinary platform dedicated to developing and showcasing art, writing, film and music created by women in Singapore.

6:56 pm  13 notes

COAST
by Sudev Suthendran

this is where forever lies, marked
and stripped bare, uncovering
beginnings, ready and rooted
in the depths
of a buoyant other side,

there was a sense in this sand,
of my birth, of a density;
but the sunken stills itself,
in a cradle of clogging froth.

it is here,
grateful to these
sensible,
defiant waters,
I dared to dream of abundance,
in tides, of weightlessness:

a rush towards sanity (everyone wants it for a destiny)
the flurry of water towards me—
away from the indecision of mankind and life:


come closer.
His current courses through you:

raise your shirt, and
approach, normally

I don’t lie.

make the seashell
your world,

cross the asymptote

and resist

the return
to land.


(BUY HERE !)

"I remember, when visiting my neighbours, that their homes remained trapped in time as well. Altars rusty and crumbling, renewed each week with candles and oranges. Sliding doors that jammed constantly but never got replaced. Once playful puppies, now aged dogs. All of us had resisted time together. We lived, refusing to succumb to newness. The world outside our doors was changing, but our inner worlds remained the same. Sometimes it felt as though choosing either option was itself a kind of death."— from Certainty by Tania De Rozario (Balik Kampung 2B: Contemplations edited by Verena Tay)

12:12 pm  16 notes

"I remember, when visiting my neighbours, that their homes remained trapped in time as well. Altars rusty and crumbling, renewed each week with candles and oranges. Sliding doors that jammed constantly but never got replaced. Once playful puppies, now aged dogs. All of us had resisted time together. We lived, refusing to succumb to newness. The world outside our doors was changing, but our inner worlds remained the same. Sometimes it felt as though choosing either option was itself a kind of death."

— from Certainty by Tania De Rozario (Balik Kampung 2B: Contemplations edited by Verena Tay)

3:20 pm  17 notes

CERIPH ISSUE 06

Ceriph is an independently run, quarterly book publication in Singapore. We seek to share Singaporean creative work in the form of prose, poetry, social commentaries, photography, and visual art. We wish to record and share these without inhibition, to celebrate these everyday musings.

The beginnings of this project are humble: whilst examining the local arts scene, we found many outlets for artistic expressions. However, most of these outlets concentrate on art or exclusively on one medium of expression over the other. Publications for local writing are even harder to come by, and cater mainly to professional and full time writers. Since then, it has been our dream to provide that space: a space that is neither too formal nor flippant, that combines word and form.

Consequently, we exist to provide an informal space for experimental or up-and-coming writers and artists to express themselves—here we present to you interesting works outside of awards and accolades that are created by ordinary observers with a pen and a voice.

Every name has a back-story, and this is ours: Ceriphs are semi structural details on the ends of alphabetical fonts that make up letters and symbols. Likewise, we hope to be the book covers and endings of these Singaporean creative pieces, to provide structural support—but at the end of the day, we hope that they speak for themselves, for you, and to you.


(also available on our webstore !)

4:01 pm  11 notes

LONTAR: The Journal of Southeast Asian Speculative Fiction
edited by Jason Erik Lundberg
published by Math Paper Press

This premiere issue of LONTAR presents speculative writing from and about the Philippines, Malaysia, Cambodia, Singapore, Laos and Vietnam.

Inside these pages, you’ll find:
• a post-apocalyptic Manila from Kate Osias
• a utopian Kuala Lumpur from Zen Cho
• a haunting military excursion down the Yellow River from Elka Ray Nguyen
• a young Laotian journalist’s place in the sensationalist future of news reporting from award-winner Paolo Bacigalupi
• speculative poetry from Chris Mooney-Singh, Ang Si Min and Bryan Thao Worra
• and an unusual exploration of Philippine magic systems from Paolo Chikiamco


now available at BooksActually & our webstore !

"…By the end of the evening, as we were walking back to the small flat she was renting across from Shimo- Kitazawa Station, it felt as though it had only been two weeks, rather than two years, since the last time we met. I knew there was something that I wanted to tell her, but I hesitated, and said nothing.Last week I received an email from a friend, asking whether I could come back to Toronto for the funeral. Another stopover. Watching the conveyer belt carry its brightly coloured dishes round and round, I realized I still wasn’t sure what I had wanted to tell her. Now I would never know.”— from Twenty-Four Flavours : Sushi    Kaiten by Alex MitchellTWENTY-FOUR FLAVOURS : SUSHI
Twenty-Four Flavours is an anthology of 24 local writers, each contributing a piece of flash fiction, not more than 250 words. Twenty-Four Flavours will run for 24 issues, each issue food-themed
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(BUY!)

12:42 am  7 notes

"…By the end of the evening, as we were walking back to the small flat she was renting across from Shimo- Kitazawa Station, it felt as though it had only been two weeks, rather than two years, since the last time we met. I knew there was something that I wanted to tell her, but I hesitated, and said nothing.

Last week I received an email from a friend, asking whether I could come back to Toronto for the funeral. Another stopover. 
Watching the conveyer belt carry its brightly coloured dishes round and round, I realized I still wasn’t sure what I had wanted to tell her. Now I would never know.”

— from Twenty-Four Flavours : Sushi
    Kaiten by Alex Mitchell


TWENTY-FOUR FLAVOURS : SUSHI

Twenty-Four Flavours is an anthology of 24 local writers, each contributing a piece of flash fiction, not more than 250 words. Twenty-Four Flavours will run for 24 issues, each issue food-themed


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(BUY!)

"Dear Fred Armisen,How is it that mangos in jars are so uniform? Is it done by machine? Who cuts them? When I purchase the jarred and perfectly luscious slices, am I supporting some horrible sweatshop full of miserable mango fabricators, hunched over with fingers puckered and slippery with the mangos’ sweet nectar?SusanDear Susan, I forwarded your letter to a mango jarrery in California. This is from the employees :Dear Susan, we are writing to you from a horrible sweatshop. It is very sweaty in here. We are mango fabricators and it is horrible because it is full of us in here. We are hunched over with fingers puckered and slippery with the mangos’ sweet nectar. Please visit us. You can come in on one of our breaks. 10:15-10:30 am is the first one so do that one.You should do it, Susan!Fred.”— from You’re a Horrible Person, But I Like You : The Believer Book of Advice—THE BELIEVER BOOK OF ADVICE+ You’re a Horrible Person, But I Like You+ Care to Make Love in That Gross Little Space Between Cars ?

4:17 pm  16 notes

"Dear Fred Armisen,

How is it that mangos in jars are so uniform? Is it done by machine? Who cuts them? When I purchase the jarred and perfectly luscious slices, am I supporting some horrible sweatshop full of miserable mango fabricators, hunched over with fingers puckered and slippery with the mangos’ sweet nectar?

Susan


Dear Susan, I forwarded your letter to a mango jarrery in California. This is from the employees :

Dear Susan, we are writing to you from a horrible sweatshop. It is very sweaty in here. We are mango fabricators and it is horrible because it is full of us in here. We are hunched over with fingers puckered and slippery with the mangos’ sweet nectar. Please visit us. You can come in on one of our breaks. 10:15-10:30 am is the first one so do that one.

You should do it, Susan!
Fred.”

— from You’re a Horrible Person, But I Like You : The Believer Book of Advice



THE BELIEVER BOOK OF ADVICE

+ You’re a Horrible Person, But I Like You
+ Care to Make Love in That Gross Little Space Between Cars ?

Gift Ideas for Christmas 2012 № 15 : for the READER —My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favourite Places to Browse, Read, and Shopedited by Ronald Rice and Booksellers Across America/When you think of your favourite bookstore, what comes to mind ? Is it the physical space ? Books stacked in rows and piled high, labeled with staff recommendations ? Do you think of the owner who knows each of her customers by name and can always press into your hands the perfect book that you’re sure to love ? Or is it the intangible thing that draws you there: the anticipation of a new discovery, or the feeling of community or of being at home ?In My Bookstore 84 of our favourite writers put all of these thoughts and feelings into words in a one-of-a-kind collection that expresses their adoration and admiration for bookstores and booksellers all across the country.

11:49 am  10 notes

Gift Ideas for Christmas 2012 № 15 :

for the READER —

My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favourite Places to Browse, Read, and Shop
edited by Ronald Rice and Booksellers Across America

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When you think of your favourite bookstore, what comes to mind ? Is it the physical space ? Books stacked in rows and piled high, labeled with staff recommendations ? Do you think of the owner who knows each of her customers by name and can always press into your hands the perfect book that you’re sure to love ? Or is it the intangible thing that draws you there: the anticipation of a new discovery, or the feeling of community or of being at home ?

In My Bookstore 84 of our favourite writers put all of these thoughts and feelings into words in a one-of-a-kind collection that expresses their adoration and admiration for bookstores and booksellers all across the country.

"The safety regulations HDB issued, requiring metal windows to be double-grilled and locked, made a further virtue out of these HDB flats: Grandmother and Mother were custodians, keeping alive rural kindness and simplicity, two of many thousands strewn across our tiny, rapidly modernising country. The kampung did not die in soil; it dissipated, withered away in the sunlessness of modernity, the sharp grids of order mapped in the sky."— from Grandfather’s Aquaria by Gwee Li Sui (in Balik Kampung edited by Verena Tay)

11:47 pm  5 notes

"The safety regulations HDB issued, requiring metal windows to be double-grilled and locked, made a further virtue out of these HDB flats: Grandmother and Mother were custodians, keeping alive rural kindness and simplicity, two of many thousands strewn across our tiny, rapidly modernising country. The kampung did not die in soil; it dissipated, withered away in the sunlessness of modernity, the sharp grids of order mapped in the sky."

— from Grandfather’s Aquaria by Gwee Li Sui (in Balik Kampung edited by Verena Tay)

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